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Re-imagining Portland’s Grant High School in 100 years

by Laurie Canup

What will Portland look like in 100 years? What does resiliency mean and how does it apply to Portland’s schools? What climate issues will we face in the next century?

Several of us here at THA formed a team to learn about these challenges and design solutions to address them last week, in a “Design Slam Competition” at the AIA Center for Architecture.

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821

Atriums: Bang or Bust?

by Laurie Canup

Last November, Dave Banks (CPP Wind), Mitch Dec (Glumac), and I had the great opportunity to do a presentation at Greenbuild about atrium designs, energy efficiency, and smoke control systems. Particularly in the Northwest region, atrium spaces can offer great energy saving benefits by bringing daylight into the building core and offering a pathway for natural and passive ventilation. However, fire and life safety issues present a design challenge. Throughout the design of the Lewis Integrative Science Building (LISB) at the University of Oregon, we learned a lot about how to design these spaces – both to save energy and to provide a safe environment in the event of a fire. For buildings that have a true atrium space, effective smoke control is an important part of ensuring life safety. After all, if it isn’t safe, it isn’t sustainable.

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502

Open your windows and let that fresh air in!

by Laurie Canup

For projects located in moderate climates that are striving to meet aggressive energy reduction goals, natural ventilation is a must. But implementing natural ventilation will introduce potentially humid air to interior spaces, which can be problematic. At Scripps Institute of Oceanography’s new MESOM laboratory project, offices and workspaces utilize operable windows to meet their primary ventilation requirements, leaving only the internally located laboratories requiring mechanical ventilation. To facilitate cross ventilation, we organized the building into a narrow bar and provided ample operable windows and large doors which open onto exterior work areas. The scientists at MESOM often work between their exterior work yard and their interior labs to prepare scientific instruments which go out to sea. Large open doors facilitate their workflow and allow breezes into the building.

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360

Women in Architecture: Go west, young woman!

by Laurie Canup

Denise Scott Brown, one of my early heroines and a successful woman-architect, has recently been the subject of a flurry of discussion in the architectural community. A group of female students from Harvard’s Graduate School of Design has petitioned to have Scott Brown’s name retroactively added to the 1991 Pritzker Prize awarded to her long-time design partner (and husband). As co-founder of her firm, Scott Brown has been a lead designer, collaborator, and writer for several decades and as such offered women inspiration as she was able to overcome the hurdles that so many of us faced. In this interview with ARCHITECT magazine, she talks about her experience as a woman in a male dominated field, and what it has meant for her to also be the “architect’s wife.”

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