Sarah Bell

Sarah Bell
An Oregon native born into a family steeped in architecture and design, Sarah has been with Hacker since 2001. Her career in marketing for the architecture industry grew out of a passion for architecture but an early realization that she does not possess enough left-brain talent to be a good architect. As Marketing Director, Sarah is a tenacious advocate for evolving the firm while honoring its origins. In her role she develops and supports the firm’s marketing strategies and facilitates business development activities. This obliges her to wear many hats – writer, planner, (arm-chair) graphic designer, researcher, coach, disciple, and mentor. Her belief in Hacker’s work, values, and people is the driving inspiration for all her business activities. Sarah has three sons, and little spare time. When she does have a little time, she loves walking, talking, and movies.

Posts by Sarah Bell

519

To Go or Not to Go?

by Sarah Bell

The “Go/No Go” decision at an architecture, engineering or construction firm is arguably one of the most important and challenging marketing decisions a company faces. For the uninitiated, “Go/No Go” decisions simply refer to a firm’s decision to go after a project or not. It can happen as early as when one first hears about a project (even if it is years off), or it most typically happens when the Request for Qualifications or Proposals hits the street. Some firms have an incredibly rigorous process, answering dozens of questions, and assigning points to them that equate to a “Go” or “No Go” answer. On the opposite side of the spectrum, firm leaders loosely debate the proposed project and make their decision based on what their “gut” tells them. Either extremes can be flawed – one might be too rigid, not allowing for nuances or variance, while the other relies more on emotion than logic. So how does a firm implement and execute an effective “Go/No Go” process?

Read more

339

What to Expect When You Are Expected Back to Work

by Sarah Bell

As the U.S. is one of three countries in the World to not have paid parental leave, and the mandated 12 weeks off is only for companies over 50 people, it is remarkably common for moms to return to work while their new baby is still very young. According to studies, 80% of women who were working while pregnant return to work, and the average maternity leave is less than 10 weeks. Looking beyond these statistics, returning to work following your maternity leave can be heartbreaking for many, and create a high level of anxiety.

Read more