69

Walking the Talk

by Annie Mahoney

In design, THA believes that architecture is best when it is an honest expression of the people and institutions it serves.

In the same way, THA supports a sustainable approach with its building projects and believes that the firm itself must also demonstrate these beliefs in daily office life and practices. This is not always easy.

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1198

University of Wyoming Visual Arts Facility Wins COTE Award

by Nic Smith

Hacker is a proud recipient of a 2016 AIA COTE Top Ten Green Projects award for University of Wyoming’s Visual Arts Facility (VAF), a pioneering LEED Platinum facility that has shaped a new approach to health, safety, and sustainability in arts education. The 80,000-SF building consolidates the University’s fine arts program from its scattered locations, establishing a central component of the campus’s new arts district. It also marks a turning point in the campus’s thinking about environmental responsibility. Read more

167

They’re Not Buildings, They’re “Assets”

by Scott Mannhard

In the spirit of our continual pursuit of authentic sustainability, I headed to the Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) International conference in Seattle recently to hear directly from owners, operators and managers about what is important to them. These people must deal with their buildings – I mean “assets” – long after their architects have moved on to other projects. The owners and managers know what energy efficiency measures actually work to save both money and resources. They know if LEED certification was an important factor or not in reducing vacancy in their building. They hear first-hand what prospective tenants expect and require when leasing or renewing space. Given this abundance of information about how buildings are actually performing for people, it was remarkable to see so few other architects there to participate in the discussion.

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297

THA and PSU Collaborate on Wind Tunnel Testing

by Miguel Hidalgo

Taking advantage of an opportunity to partner within our community, THA is collaborating with a team of Portland State University’s Architecture and Engineering students on the design of certain elements within a Land Port of Entry facility in Laredo, Texas. The student team’s goal is to investigate the impact of building mass, canopy shape and site wall height on wind direction and speed. THA’s design team and the student team worked together during the fall 2012 semester to develop site scale and building scale models for testing within the University’s wind tunnel laboratory. The results of these studies will inform the development of the project design as it proceeds from the schematic design to the design development phase.

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599

THA + PSU Research Collaboration Update

by Miguel Hidalgo

As a continuation of our ongoing research relationship with Portland State University, we’ve just begun another student / design team investigative session. The purpose of this collaboration is to give PSU architectural and engineering students the opportunity to engage in research on real projects that supports specific sustainability goals. On the other side, our design teams hope to gain timely and specific knowledge to enhance project design.

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918

Re-imagining Portland’s Grant High School in 100 years

by Laurie Canup

What will Portland look like in 100 years? What does resiliency mean and how does it apply to Portland’s schools? What climate issues will we face in the next century?

Several of us here at THA formed a team to learn about these challenges and design solutions to address them last week, in a “Design Slam Competition” at the AIA Center for Architecture.

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470

PCC’s Academic Building Exceeds 2030 Target

by Nick Hodges

As sustainable initiatives and energy efficiency become more the norm than the exception – often design drivers even in budget-constrained public projects – sustainable solutions must respond to the need for simplicity and cost-effectiveness. Portland Community College’s and THA’s commitment to affordable sustainability is demonstrated in the new 45,000 square foot three-story academic building at the Cascade Campus in North Portland. Recently completed modeling projects the new facility, which includes classrooms, faculty workspace, informal student learning spaces, a child development center and space for programs whose mission is promoting educational opportunities, will be 73% more energy efficient than the national average for this type of building.

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502

Open your windows and let that fresh air in!

by Laurie Canup

For projects located in moderate climates that are striving to meet aggressive energy reduction goals, natural ventilation is a must. But implementing natural ventilation will introduce potentially humid air to interior spaces, which can be problematic. At Scripps Institute of Oceanography’s new MESOM laboratory project, offices and workspaces utilize operable windows to meet their primary ventilation requirements, leaving only the internally located laboratories requiring mechanical ventilation. To facilitate cross ventilation, we organized the building into a narrow bar and provided ample operable windows and large doors which open onto exterior work areas. The scientists at MESOM often work between their exterior work yard and their interior labs to prepare scientific instruments which go out to sea. Large open doors facilitate their workflow and allow breezes into the building.

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1245

Nurturing Growth in Lents Town Center

by Garrett Martin

On Sunday October 23rd of last year, we joined Bremik Construction and the Portland Development Commission to strike golden shovels into the ground and begin construction on the 9101 SE Foster project, a mixed-use multi-family building in the heart of Lents Town Center.

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1148

Hacker is Carbon Neutral

by Sarah Post-Holmberg

Hacker was founded on the idea that architecture should be in service to community. For over three decades the firm has designed enduring spaces that inspire people to contribute to positive cultural change. This guiding vision extends beyond humanity to encompass the natural world and the diversity of species it supports. Over the years, Hacker has developed an aesthetic for buildings that interact dynamically with their surroundings and make humble use of the earth’s resources. Through research, conference engagement, and continuing education, we continue to refine our design process, detailing, and material choices to reflect our priority of preserving the well-being of all life systems on our planet.

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